Animals

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NPR

Protein In Tarantula Venom Could Be Used As Insecticide

Scientists in Australia report they have found a way to turn a protein found in the venom of the Australian tarantula into an insecticide. Tests show the protein is particularly effective against the cotton bollworm.
NPR

Pets Or Livestock? A Moral Divide Over Horse Slaughter

Horse slaughter is banned in the U.S., but thousands of American horses are shipped to Canada and Mexico for slaughter every year. Investors argue restarting the practice in the U.S. would be better for business and offer a more humane end for horses that are neglected under the current model.
NPR

Four-Legged Impostors Give Service Dog Owners Pause

People who lack special needs but simply want to keep their pets with them all the time can easily find fake "service animal" certifications on the Web. But those phony credentials can create problems for people with disabilities who legitimately need trained service dogs.
NPR

Hired Hog Trapper Has Three Years To Clean Out Dallas

Feral hogs have been a growing problem in Texas for years now. The 300-pound animals contaminate the water and ruin the parks, so Dallas is bringing in Osvaldo Rojas to keep the city pig-free.
NPR

Answering The Cranes' Call: 40 Years Of Preserving Grace

Cranes are elegant and endangered. For four decades, the International Crane Foundation has focused on their conservation. NPR's Jacki Lyden talks to one of the organization's co-founders, George Archibald, about a life spent researching his feathered friends all around the world.
NPR

From The Fall Of Failure, Success Can Take Flight

Risking and embracing failure is part of the job for explorers and adventurers like aeronaut Salomon August Andrée. His fatal attempt at reaching the North Pole motivated others to push their own limits. The September issue of National Geographic investigates "famous failures" and why they mattered.
NPR

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors

Snowshoe hares rely on camouflage, turning white in the winter to match the snow, and then turning brown for the summer. But a changing climate could mean fewer days with snow on the ground, and more days when they're visible to prey.
WAMU 88.5

Bethesda-Based Military School Ends Using Live Animals For Surgical Training

The use of live animals for military medical training has just ended at Uniformed Services University in Bethesda.

WAMU 88.5

Future Of Alexandria's Woodlawn Stables Threatened By Road Project

The Fairfax County horse stables, which have been in the same location for over 50 years, could be displaced by a road project.

NPR

What's Mittens Thinking? Make 'Sense' Of Your Cat's Behavior

Kitties don't play — they hunt. And their aloof appearance has evolutionary roots. In a new book, anthrozoologist John Bradshaw explains cats' mysterious nature and looks at how the cat's relationship with humans has changed over the years.

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