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Radiocarbon Clues Help Track Down Poached Elephant Ivory

Nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s and '60s pumped a lot of radiocarbon into the atmosphere. It went everywhere, including into plants that elephants eat. By measuring the levels of this carbon in elephant tusks, scientists can tell when an elephant died — and whether the ivory is being traded illegally.
WAMU 88.5

David Rothenberg: "Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise" (Rebroadcast)

A musician travels the world to study the science of bug music: what we can learn from sounds of crickets, cicadas and beetles.

WAMU 88.5

Investigation Opened Into Alleged Dog Poisoning In Logan Circle

The Washington Humane Society is warning dog owners in the Logan Circle neighborhood of Northwest D.C. to look out for toxic dog treats after a resident reported finding an poisoned pill pocket.
NPR

Bird On Rare Visit To U.K. Killed As Dismayed Twitchers Watch

When a white-throated needletail was spotted off the northwest coast of Scotland, dozens of enthusiasts rushed to the area. "Twitchers" is British slang for those who have a passion for spotting hard-to-find birds. But their joy turned to grief when the little bird from Asia hit a wind turbine.
WAMU 88.5

Rusty The Red Panda Used Tree Limbs To Escape

The mystery surrounding Rusty the Red Panda's escape from the National Zoo earlier this week has been solved.

WAMU 88.5

Assateague Island Welcomes New Foal

There's a new addition to Assateague Island's wild pony herd.

WAMU 88.5

Red Knot Population On The Decline

In the 1980s, experts counted more than 100,000 Red Knots, but over the last 20 years their numbers have fallen to an estimated 25,000.

NPR

Seattle Moves Fireworks Display Out Of Respect For Eaglets

A couple of eaglets are in a nest in a Seattle suburb, near the spot where the city launches its Independence Day fireworks. The local Audubon Society worried fireworks would startle the baby birds which are still too young to fly. So organizers moved the launch site.
NPR

Pitch-Perfect: Why Our Shoulders Are Key To Throwing

Being able to throw with power and precision must have been advantageous to our early ancestors. And essential, too, since we don't have natural weapons found in other species, like fangs and claws. A recent study suggests our ability to throw so well depends on uniquely human shoulder anatomy.
WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: Combating Light Pollution

America is losing its dark sky. Artificial light at night is harming sea turtles and other animals and has been linked to health problems in humans. For this month's Environmental Outlook, fighting light pollution.

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