Animals

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NPR

Changing Climate In Argentina Is Killing Penguin Chicks

The world's largest breeding colony of Magellanic penguins is seeing unprecedented deaths among young birds. A scientist who has spent 30 years studying the penguins says that climate change is to blame — triggering, among other things, more heat waves and wetter storms that kill fledglings.
WAMU 88.5

Twitter-Famous Snowy Owl Receiving Treatment After Being Hit By Metrobus

The snowy owl that has prowled downtown D.C. in recent weeks, causing a social media sensation, is being treated after reportedly being struck by a bus.

NPR

Oil Rush A Cash Cow For Some Farmers, But Tensions Crop Up

North Dakota's oil sector is booming, but agriculture remains the state's largest industry. And while many farmers and ranchers are profiting from the oil beneath the prairie, others complain that drilling is interfering with their business — and changing rural life as they know it.
NPR

Pig Virus Continues To Spread, Raising Fears Of Pricier Bacon

Porcine epidemic diarrhea, or PED, virus has killed about 1 million baby pigs in the U.S. since April. Its effect on the pork industry is small so far, but analysts say it could send pork prices rising if it isn't controlled.
NPR

Contagious Cancer In Dogs Leaves Prehistoric Paw Prints

Dogs can catch a strange type of cancer through sex. Now scientists have decoded the DNA of the tumor and found that the cancer cells are a living fossil of an ancient dog that lived thousands of years ago. This cancer doesn't affect people, but the findings may offer insights into how tumors fool the human immune system.
NPR

A Growth Factor Heals The Damage To A Preemie's Brain — In Mice

Scientists have shown that damage to the brain's "white matter" is responsible for many of the developmental problems that very premature infants often face. Now researchers have also demonstrated that it's possible to prevent that sort of damage in mice.
NPR

Ambassador Kennedy Criticizes Japan's Dolphin Hunt

The dolphin roundup by a Japanese community is an annual hunt. But this time, new U.S. ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy has weighed in with displeasure. That puts her on the side of several wildlife and animal rights advocates who've condemned the annual slaughter. The Japanese defend it as traditional — just as the U.S. does with native Alaskans who kill whales.
NPR

Ancient And Vulnerable: 25 Percent Of Sharks And Rays Risk Extinction

"People know about the global trade in shark fins, but few know that some of the most valuable fins ... used in shark fin soup come from the sharklike rays — species like sawfishes and wedgefishes and guitarfishes," says Sonja Fordham, who contributed to a new analysis of the fisheries.
WAMU 88.5

Animal Welfare And The Food We Eat

Two pork producers say they'll improve treatment of their hogs and sows in a move that's been applauded by animal welfare groups. We explore animal welfare and the food we eat.

NPR

Mild-Mannered Stingrays Can Inflict A World Of Hurt

These cousins of the shark send thousands of waders and surfers yelping for medical help each year. A powerful toxin in the barb of the ray's tail triggers a "knifelike pain" that can last for hours. Best prevention? Do the "stingray shuffle."

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