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District's 'Bird Man' Documents City's Winged Creatures

Ever since Wallace Kornack retired as a government engineer, he's made daily trips into Rock Creek Park to document migrant birds.

WAMU 88.5

Why Is D.C.'s Feather ID Lab Studying Snakes?

We find out why scientists at Smithsonian's Feather ID Lab have begun studying a most unbird-like creature: the Burmese python.

NPR

Human Scent Is Even Sweeter For Malaria Mosquitoes

Scientists used a Dutch woman's dirty stocking to learn that mosquitoes infected with malaria find humans hard to resist. Like a fungus that turns ants into zombies, the parasite seems to change the behavior of the mosquitoes for its own benefit.
NPR

Go Fish (Somewhere Else): Warming Oceans Are Altering Catches

Fish are moving away from the equator and toward the poles to maintain their preferred water temperature. That means, for example, that fishermen are seeing swordfish normally found in the Mediterranean swimming near Denmark. But in the tropics, there are no fish to replace the ones that are leaving.
NPR

The Enemy Inside: Rhino's Protectors Sometimes Aid Poachers

The defenders of Africa's rhinos are battling a well-financed and well-informed enemy. Poachers clear up to $60,000 on the Asian market for a single rhino horn. They have cash for the latest weaponry and to pay for inside information from some of the very people whose job it is to protect the rhinos.
NPR

Vietnam's Appetite For Rhino Horn Drives Poaching In Africa

Demand for rhino horn, used in traditional Chinese medicine, is fueling a slaughter of the animals in Africa. In Vietnam, the sought-after commodity is fetching prices as high as $1,400 an ounce, or about the price of gold. There, some believe ground horn can cure everything from hangovers to cancer.
NPR

For Year-Round Buzz, Beekeepers 'Fast-Forward Darwinism'

Honeybees are in trouble across the U.S., but one association in Massachusetts is hoping to boost the population in its own area. The bees it currently uses have a hard time surviving the winter and battling other foes that have been killing bees nationwide. So beekeepers in Plympton decided to breed their own.

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