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NPR

Go Fish (Somewhere Else): Warming Oceans Are Altering Catches

Fish are moving away from the equator and toward the poles to maintain their preferred water temperature. That means, for example, that fishermen are seeing swordfish normally found in the Mediterranean swimming near Denmark. But in the tropics, there are no fish to replace the ones that are leaving.
NPR

The Enemy Inside: Rhino's Protectors Sometimes Aid Poachers

The defenders of Africa's rhinos are battling a well-financed and well-informed enemy. Poachers clear up to $60,000 on the Asian market for a single rhino horn. They have cash for the latest weaponry and to pay for inside information from some of the very people whose job it is to protect the rhinos.
NPR

Vietnam's Appetite For Rhino Horn Drives Poaching In Africa

Demand for rhino horn, used in traditional Chinese medicine, is fueling a slaughter of the animals in Africa. In Vietnam, the sought-after commodity is fetching prices as high as $1,400 an ounce, or about the price of gold. There, some believe ground horn can cure everything from hangovers to cancer.
NPR

For Year-Round Buzz, Beekeepers 'Fast-Forward Darwinism'

Honeybees are in trouble across the U.S., but one association in Massachusetts is hoping to boost the population in its own area. The bees it currently uses have a hard time surviving the winter and battling other foes that have been killing bees nationwide. So beekeepers in Plympton decided to breed their own.
NPR

Rhino Horns Fuel Deadly, Intercontinental Trade

NPR's Frank Langfitt and Gregory Warner have teamed up for a series about how myth and money are driving extraordinary slaughter of rhinos. They talk with host Rachel Martin about the issue, which has repercussions from the African continent all the way to Asia.
NPR

To Count Elephants In The Forest, Watch Where You Step

To know how elephants are faring, they need to be counted. But how do you count them when they're hidden under thick forest canopies? A conservationist in the 1980s started to count their poop, and that helped to create a model of elephants' numbers and movement through the forest.

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