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Research Shows New Flu Viruses Often Arise In Domestic Animals

Scientists have apparently been wrong about where new flu viruses come from, and they've underestimated the viruses' connection to horses. The dogma is that new viruses always incubate in wild migratory birds first, then get into domestic poultry, and then jump into mammals — especially pigs and humans.
NPR

Illegal, Remote Pot Farms In California Poisoning Rare Wildlife

Weasel-like fishers, spotted owls and other small predators have become collateral damage as illegal marijuana growers push deep into remote forests of Northern California. Biologists warn that the heavy use of insecticide and rat poison to protect crops is pushing some wildlife species to the edge.
WAMU 88.5

Curbing The Overuse Of Antibiotics

Overprescription of antibiotics has led to the development of antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" that kill thousands each year. Antibiotics in animal feed add to the problem. We look at how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other groups aim to track antibiotic use and curb overuse.

NPR

Make It A Grande: Mammoth Tusk Find Likely Seattle's Largest

A giant tusk from a Columbian mammoth that lived 16,000 years ago appears to be the largest, most intact ever found in the region.
NPR

Archaeology Find: Camels In 'Bible' Are Literary Anachronisms

New research revealing when camels were domesticated by humans shows that many depictions of camels in scripture may be off by hundreds of years. Renee Montagne talks to Carol Meyers, a professor of religious studies at Duke University, about what such anachronisms tell us about the genesis of religious texts.
WAMU 88.5

On The Coast: Turning A Love Of Life On The Water Into A Job

Oysters were once an important part of the coastal economy — and now two men are trying to bring back that once-thriving seafood industry.

NPR

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction' Are Humans The Asteroid?

The dinosaurs were killed during the Fifth Extinction — which scientists suspect was caused by an asteroid. Now, we are living through an epoch that many scientists describe as the Sixth Extinction and this time, human activity is the culprit.
NPR

U.S. To Ban Commercial Trade Of Elephant Ivory

The U.S. government has announced new restrictions in the trade of African elephant ivory. Imports and exports are banned and sales are limited to antiques at least 100 years old. It's part of a broader effort to protect elephants and other animals from escalating illegal wildlife trade.
NPR

For Elephants And Rhinos, Poaching Trends Point In Wrong Direction

A decade ago, fewer than 100 rhinos were killed annually in South Africa. Last year, it was more than 1,000. Wildlife conservation groups from around the globe are gathering in London this week, hoping to find ways to slow the trade in rhino horns, elephant tusks and other illegal wildlife products.
NPR

3 New Breeds Compete In Annual Dog Show

The world may be focused on the events in Sochi, but more than 3,000 international competitors have converged on New York City for another prestigious contest: The 138th annual Westminster Dog Show.

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