Animals

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What Does It Take To Map A Walrus Hangout? 160 Years And A Lot Of Help

Groups of walruses are vulnerable to disturbances, but it's hard to avoid them if you don't know where they are. A new tool from U.S. and Russian researchers draws on history to protect the animals.
NPR

Fisherman Helps Shark That Is Too Tired To Swim Off On Its Own

A man in Ocean City, Md., caught a shark with the intention of letting it go. Determined to get the exhausted shark out to sea, the fisherman carried it out to deeper waters, where it swam away.
NPR

Fishing And Foraging: How To Catch Your Seafood, Ethically

Fisherman Kirk Lombard's new book teaches people to fish and forage along the northern California coast, while urging them to harvest in moderation, follow regulations and respect sea creatures.
NPR

Worm Quiz: Don't Try To Squirm Your Way Out Of It

Do you know how long the longest earthworm is? Or how people might contract a parasitic worm?
NPR

Bird Myth Busters: Do Birds Fly To The Moon In Winter? And Other Unknowns

Do hummingbirds migrate on the backs of geese? And will rice thrown at weddings really make birds explode? Scott Simon gets to the bottom of some bird myths with Ray Brown, host of "Talkin' Birds."
NPR

Why I'm Fascinated By Parasitic Worms

To many parasitic worms, we are the world. And the way they've evolved to live within us — without wiping us out — is stunning.
NPR

The Power Of Worm Poop

What comes out of the tail end of worms appears to be very good for crops.
NPR

Once Nearly Extinct California Island Foxes No Longer Endangered

Thanks to an aggressive recovery effort, a species of tiny foxes endemic to California recovers in what researchers say is record time.
NPR

Bald Eagle's Comeback Means Bad News For Other Rare Birds

The recovery of the bald eagle is bad news for herons, loons and other rare birds. Their numbers are being decimated by eagles who prey upon them.
NPR

Talk About An Ancient Mariner! Greenland Shark Is At Least 272 Years Old

This Arctic species can live longer than any other known animal advanced enough to have a backbone, scientists say — maybe more than 500 years. Their muscles might hold clues that could help humans.

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