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Dog Trained As Ultimate Whale Pooper Snooper

Scientists aren't sure what's wrong with the orcas in Puget Sound, but they're hot on the trail. A team of researchers is relying on a secret weapon with a killer nose to sniff out the mystery.
NPR

Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies: Blame The Parasites?

The honey bee population of North America is declining and new research may help answer why. It shows the bees can become hosts of a fly parasite, which causes them to become disoriented and leave their nests. Scott Simon talks with San Francisco State University's Andrew Core, who authored the study.
NPR

Why Overpriced Japanese Sushi Is Bad For Bluefin Stocks

A Japanese sushi magnate paid $736,000 this week for one 593-pound bluefin tuna, the highest amount ever paid for a single fish. But environmentalists say this extravagant sale may encourage fishermen to continue to exceed set quotas for catching bluefin.
NPR

Mystery Solved: Why The Cat Craves Mushrooms (And People Do, Too)

Why would a cat crave mushrooms? A scientist says it's the umami. Though cats can't taste sweetness like people can, they are aces at sniffing out the amino acids that signal protein-rich foods.
NPR

Near Icy Waters, Marine Life Gets By Swimmingly

Hairy-chested yeti crabs, seven-armed sea stars, white octopuses — all these creatures were seen for the first time by researchers in the Antarctic. Robert Siegel talks to biologist Alex Rodgers of the University of Oxford, who led the expedition.
NPR

FDA Agrees To Limit Antibiotics In Livestock

The FDA is increasing regulations on a class of antibiotic drugs commonly used by livestock producers. The drugs are great for treating infections in animals and humans. Food safety advocates say the over-use of cephalosporin in animals has contributed to the development of diseases that tolerate the antibiotic.
NPR

Zoo Crafts Love Nest To Save Ozark's Salamanders

The large, flat, slimy, river-dwelling hellbenders are among the world's largest salamanders — and they're quickly disappearing. But thanks to a new conservation program and a high-tech ecosystem at the Saint Louis Zoo, scientists say 2012 could be a year of resurgence for the animals.

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