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NPR

Enough With Baby Talk; Infants Learn From Lemur Screeches, Too

Even infants too young to discern the meaning of words seem better able to learn while listening to the sound of human speech than while listening to nonsense — speech run backward. Little surprise there, perhaps, but a study shows that recordings of lemur calls spark learning, too.
NPR

Wild Stork Picked Up For Spying In Egypt

A fisherman saw the bird along the Nile River with a suspicious electronic device fixed to its wing. The fisherman made a citizen's arrest. Concerned officials found it was not a spying device, just a wildlife tracker.
WAMU 88.5

Measles-Like Virus Killing Dolphins In Mid-Atlantic

Just one day after a critically ill bottlenose dolphin beached itself in Ocean City, another of its kind was found dead early this morning.

NPR

Dogs Prove To Be Key In Battle Against Giant African Snails

While Florida hasn't yet declared victory, more than 128,000 of the destructive creatures have been found and eradicated in the past two years. Labrador retrievers are being used to sniff out the snails.
NPR

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Keep Captive-Bred Fledglings On Track

A decade ago, cranes that had never before migrated followed the lead of an ultralight plane to learn the route south. Several generations later, old cranes are teaching young birds to navigate that same route. It's a clue that migration is a combination of nature and nurture, researchers say.
NPR

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

No one knows exactly how farmers use antibiotics. Many public health experts say the government should collect and publish detailed information because antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly urgent problem. But many farm groups are opposed.
NPR

Some Rattlesnakes Losing Their Warning Rattle In S. Dakota

There are few things more chilling than the sound of a nearby rattlesnake. That distinctive sound serves as a warning that trouble could be on the way. The only thing worse than hearing a rattlesnake within striking distance — is not hearing it at all. A herpetologist in South Dakota's Black Hills has discovered a growing number of Prairie Rattlesnakes with atrophied tail muscles; he believes it's a genetic issue that multiplies because those snakes that can rattle usually end up being killed. But others think the situation could be an evolutionary development to avoid detection.
WAMU 88.5

D.C. Police Add Sharp-Nosed Four-Legged Member To Ranks

The D.C. Police Department has a new recruit, and he's got a nose for the job.

NPR

A Single Protein May Help Explain Memory Loss In Old Age

Age-related fumbles of memory are often feared as early signs of Alzheimer's dementia, but recent research confirms an important difference. The underlying biology of the two sorts of memory loss aren't the same. And the age-related form may be reversible someday.
NPR

Cat Sets Record For Long Hair

A Persian long hair in Seattle named Colonel Meow set the record. His hair stretches 9 inches. It's not that crazy for that breed of cat. His owners swear that Colonel is not using any product.

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