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NPR

Dog-Gone Genetics: A Few Genes Control Fido's Looks

Humans have complicated genetic structures — not so dogs. Almost every physical trait in canines is controlled by just a few genes, which means custom-breeding a dog is only a matter of flipping a few genetic switches.
NPR

How One Former Vegan Learned To Embrace Butchering

To connect better to community and food, one twenty-something has trained to become a butcher.
WAMU 88.5

Eagle Advocates Warn About Lead Poisoning

While increased protections have helped bald eagle populations in the D.C. area bounce back, birds are still at risk thanks to lead shot being used by hunters.

WAMU 88.5

Scientists Say Amphibian Die-Offs Hit Area Years Ago

slimy salamander

A fungal plague causing havoc on amphibians across the globe may have already hit Virginia decades ago, according to a study by local scientists.

NPR

LIVE: Jewel (A Bear) May Soon Give Birth; A Webcam Lets Us Watch

Two years ago, her sister Lily gave birth live on the Web. Now it's Jewel's turn. People from around the world have logged on to see how the Minnesota bear is doing.
NPR

Labs Size Up New Guidelines For Rodent Cages

Mice and rats are the most common lab animals. That's why some influential new guidelines on how to house mother rodents and their babies have created an uproar. Some experts at research centers say there's no evidence that making costly changes will really benefit the animals.
NPR

New Tuberculosis Strain Thwarts All Antibiotics

Physicians in India have discovered a strain of tuberculosis they call 'TDR' for 'Totally Drug-Resistant'--meaning there is no antibiotic available to fight it. Maryn McKenna, author of Superbug, discusses the possible origins of the strain, and what options--if any--doctors have to treat it.
NPR

Talking Science With Arianna Huffington

The new year marks the creation of a science section at The Huffington Post. The Internet newspaper's editor-in-chief, Arianna Huffington discusses the story selection and vetting process. And why the launch coincides with what she calls the explosion of medieval thinking.
NPR

Get Inked For Science

Writer Carl Zimmer became an "unintentional curator" of science-themed tattoos after noticing a double helix on a friend's arm. Sensing a trend, he asked his blog readers to send photos of their science tattoos. Some of those images are gathered in his new book Science Ink.
NPR

Mine's Smaller! Claim About Tiny Frog Is Challenged

There's a frog in Papua New Guinea that researchers announced this week is "the smallest known vertebrate species." But a male deep-sea anglerfish may have a better claim to that title.

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