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NPR

That'll Do, Pig: Neil's Not A Hog After All

It's a happy ending for Neil the potbelly pig, who faced eviction from his California home. Pigs are allowed as pets in Sierra Madre, but not hogs. An animal control officer suspected Neil was a hog — that is, a pig weighing more than 120 pounds. But a protest rally turned into a party when Neil was designated a legal pig by the city.
NPR

Eeek, Snake! Your Brain Has A Special Corner Just For Them

Humans and other primates have really good vision. One scientist thinks that ability evolved in part to help monkeys and humans quickly recognize venomous snakes. When monkeys see photos of snakes, neurons in a specific part of the brain light up. The neurons respond to photos of the reptiles more than to monkey faces.
NPR

Delegates To Debate Watered-Down Plan For Antarctic Marine Preserve

Diplomats are again meeting to consider setting aside a protected zone in the pristine waters around Antarctica, though their previous negotiations ended in failure. A scaled-back plan on the table this week would still create the largest marine preserve in the world.
NPR

Widespread Plague In Wildlife Threatens Western Ecosystems

For most of us, plague is something that maybe we read about in history books. In the 14th Century, it wiped out half of Europe's population. But the bacteria is busy killing wildlife now in the American West. By studying small mammals scientists have learned that plague is far more pervasive a killer than anyone thought.
NPR

FDA Asks Dog Owners For Help With Illnesses Linked To Jerky

The agency still doesn't know what's inside jerkies, tenders and strips that have sickened thousands of dogs and killed hundreds. An ongoing investigation is focused on treats imported from China. Pet owners should watch for loss of appetite, listlessness and vomiting.
NPR

How Did The Chicken Cross The Road? In Style

We all know why the chicken crossed the road. Now, a new product wants to make sure they get to the other side safely. As chickens become more popular as pets, the British company Omlet is selling high-visibility chicken jackets — tiny fluorescent safety vets for when they're on the streets.
NPR

Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out

Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in the U.S. has been cut in half. Today, the domestic sheep herd is one-tenth the size it was during World War II. Consumers are eating less lamb and wearing less wool these days. Those trends have left ranchers to wonder: When are we going to hit bottom?
NPR

Engineering A Cooler Climate, Robo-Roaches, Anoushka Shankar

In this weekend's podcast of All Things Considered, host Arun Rath investigates the controversial practice of engineering the planet's climate with man-made chemicals. Plus, music from Anoushka Shankar and Norah Jones.
NPR

For The Ultimate Getaway, Why Not South Sudan?

You may not find South Sudan at the top of most dream destination lists, but the authors of a new travel guide say the young country, long isolated by a violent civil war, has much to offer tourists in search of wildlife, culture and natural beauty.
NPR

Why Scientists Are Trying Viruses To Beat Back Bacteria

Researchers say naturally occurring viruses that target bacteria might one day help help treat human infections with germs that are resistant to antibiotics. The research is still in the early stages, and there are quite a few challenges to overcome before a treatment can even be tested in humans.

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