WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio | The Mind Is Our Medium

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Prediction

Our panelists predict, what will A-Rod do now he's not playing baseball?
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Obama Vague On Details In His Intelligence Proposals

Intelligence officials, civil libertarians, technology executives, and foreign leaders: All of them had something at stake Friday when President Obama laid out his ideas for reforming the National Security Agency's surveillance programs. The president sought to balance security and privacy concerns in his speech.
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Three Years After Uprisings, Arab States Take Different Paths

Tunisians were celebrating this week. Egyptians were voting on a new constitution. Syrians are hoping peace talks can end their civil war. Several Arab Spring nations are now working through key events that will shape the road ahead.
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Federal Judge Says N.C. Ultrasound Abortion Law Is Illegal

The state's controversial law required women who want to have an abortion to first have an ultrasound scan and have it described to them. A federal judge calls the law "an impermissible attempt to compel these providers to deliver the state's message in favor of childbirth and against abortion."
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Supreme Court To Decide If Warrant Needed To Search Cellphone

The U.S. Supreme Court is delving into the technology-versus-privacy debate, agreeing to hear two cases that test whether police making an arrest may search cellphones without a warrant. A decision is expected this year.
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Foreign Fighters Flood Both Sides In Syrian War

When peace talks open in Switzerland, one common concern between the West and Syria is expected to be the threat of Islamist extremists and the rise of al-Qaida-linked militias. Thousands of Sunni militants from around the world have joined the rebel groups in Syria, but there are other groups of militant foreign fighters who support the Syrian regime. Iraqi Shiites are being recruited in the thousands to bolster Syria's armed forces. Recruiting billboards and social media help portray the fight as an existential battle between Sunnis and Muslims.
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Why U.S. Taxpayers Started — And Stopped — Paying Brazilian Cotton Farmers

The Brazilians said U.S. cotton subsidies violated global trade rules. So the U.S. government kept the subsidies, and started paying Brazilian cotton farmers, too.
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In Egypt, 'Yes' Votes Spell Easier Path For Military Rule

Although official results have not yet been finalized, it is clear that Egyptians voted overwhelmingly in favor of the new constitution in this week's referendum. Preliminary figures show that slightly more voters cast their ballot than in last year's referendum. According to many analysts, the results of the vote make it easier for military chief General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to declare himself a candidate in the upcoming presidential election.
WAMU 88.5

Linking Poverty And Poor Health

As Congress debates cuts to food assistance programs like SNAP benefits, some doctors and advocates for the poor say the study is further evidence that cutting food and other assistance programs leads to expensive health care crises.

WAMU 88.5

Dispatches From Ethiopia: U.S. Ambassador To The African Union

Kojo talks with the U.S. Ambassador to the African Union, Reuben Brigety, at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, about South Sudan peace talks, the African Union and the U.S. role on the continent.

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