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Author Catherine Chung: 'I Want To Embrace The Things That I Am'

The author of Forgotten Country went from crunching numbers to writing, though she says words were always her first love. Her novel explores the tenuous lines between freedom and selfishness.
NPR

Syrian Humanitarian Crisis As Bad As Rwanda?

The U.S. says the Syrian humanitarian crisis is spiraling out of control. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary for Population, Refugees, and Migration at the U.S. Department of State.
NPR

Jury Nullification: Acquitting Based On Principle

A new billboard in D.C. is asking jurors to forget about the law, and go with their gut when it comes to acquitting defendants. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with two former federal prosecutors about the pros and cons of jury nullification.
NPR

On U.S. Embassy Takeover Anniversary, Iran's Hardliners Rally

A group of hardliners in Iran plans a "Grand Day of Death to America" on Monday, which is the 34th anniversary of the takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. Steve Inskeep talks to New York Times Tehran Bureau Chief Thomas Erdbrink about the conservative effort to dampen a new wave of openness and optimism ushered in by President Hassan Rouhani.
NPR

Murder Trial Begins For Egypt's Ex-President Then Adjourns

The trial of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi got off to a raucous start in Cairo on Monday. The country's first democratically-elected president is charged with inciting violence and murder. The judge adjourned the case until January.
NPR

Syria's Moderate Rebels Fight A Battle On Two Fronts

On one side, they are battling forces loyal to the Assad regime; on the other, Islamist rebels from among their own ranks. But while the Islamists and the regime are both well-funded, the moderate rebels are looking to the U.S. for aid — and getting little in return.
NPR

Staving Off Confrontation While Watching Birds

Host Arun Rath talks with African-American wildlife biologist J. Drew Lanham about his article in the current issue of Orion Magazine, "9 Rules for the Black Birdwatcher."
NPR

N.Y. Stop-And-Frisk Reforms On Hold For New Year, New Mayor

The legal battle over the New York City Police Department's controversial policy took a dramatic turn last week. A federal judge had ruled the practice unconstitutional, but an appeals court put that order on hold. What will happen next will partly depend on who New York's next mayor is.
NPR

Racial Profiling A Lifelong Reality For Ta-Nehisi Coates

Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates grew up in Baltimore, and it was there, as a teenager, that he first felt he was being singled out for his race. Coates joins NPR's Rachel Martin to talk about his personal experiences with racial profiling, from his first experience in a store through the concerns he has for his own son.
NPR

Listeners Share Stories Of Profiling

New York is the flashpoint in the debate over racial profiling, but it happens in all different pockets of America. We asked our listeners to share some of their experiences.

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