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As Police Monitor Social Media, Legal Lines Become Blurred

Police are buying software programs that help them track suspicious activity on the Web. But they come with a risk: If they're used too aggressively, the department could end up in court.
WAMU 88.5

Phone Rates For Inmates

New FCC rules capping rates for interstate phone calls to and from prisons went into effect recently. We speak to prisoner advocates and telecom companies about the change.

NPR

Will President's Initiative Be A 'Game-Changer' For Young Men Of Color?

"My Brother's Keeper" is a new White House initiative designed to help young men of color succeed. Law professor Paul Butler and youth advocate Malik Washington discuss the president's new plan.
NPR

A Greek Treasure Pulled From The Sea Disappears Again In Gaza

The Hamas government says it has an important relic: an ancient statue of the god Apollo, found by a fisherman. It hopes the bronze figure attracts foreign interest but hasn't yet shown it publicly.
NPR

Thermal Imaging Gets More Common But The Courts Haven't Caught Up

A new smartphone app will make it easy for you to detect a water leak, spot animals while hunting and more. But the new technology raises a question that the Supreme Court thought it had settled.
NPR

To Play The Part, Actors Must Talk The Talk — In Chinese

As Hollywood and China grow closer, more roles are opening up for Asian-American actors to play Chinese-speaking characters. But before they can sound fluent on screen, some turn to dialect coaches.
NPR

Minority Aspirants To Federal Bench Are Hindered By Underrating

The American Bar Association ranks nominees to the federal bench, with low rankings making confirmation difficult. A new study finds that these rankings systematically underrate women and minorities.
NPR

Federal Judge Voids Texas Gay Marriage Ban

Saying that a Texas law barring same-sex marriage is unconstitutional and demeans the dignity of homosexuals, a federal judge struck down the law Wednesday.
NPR

Supreme Court Allows Stanford Ponzi Scheme Suits To Go Forward

The high court agreed with investors who lost billions in a massive fraud perpetrated by tycoon Allen Stanford. By a 7-to-2 vote, the justices allowed their state class action suits to go forward.
NPR

In Benghazi, U.S. Intelligence Wasn't Focused On 'Homegrown Militants'

New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick spent months on the ground in Benghazi, Libya, trying to get to the bottom of the deadly Sept. 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate.

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