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Bluff The Listener

Our panelists each tell us about a new way to turn away unwanted advances, only one of which is real.
NPR

A New Study Says ...

We listen back to a round of questions for our panel, in which Paula took certain issue with the scientific method.
NPR

Not My Job: Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake Gets Quizzed On Winter Sports

We've asked Flake to play a game called "Dude, that skijoring was sick!" Three questions about non-Olympic winter sports. Originally broadcast Feb. 15, 2014.
NPR

Syrian Rebel Stronghold On The Verge Of Government Takeover

The Syrian city of Homs has been a rebel stronghold since the anti-government uprising began. But one rebel tells NPR that they're low on ammunition and medical gear.
NPR

FO-PRO

NPR's Wade Goodwyn promotes his interview next hour with Lisa Robinson, a journalist who spent four decades interviewing the biggest names in music.
WAMU 88.5

A Lime Shortage and Our Food Market

Ninety-eight percent of the limes consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, where a confluence of factors have led to a shortage of the fruit. We explore what's behind the spike in lime prices.

NPR

Inmates To Be Moved Temporarily Out Of Infamous Iraqi Prison

Kelly McEvers talks to Ned Parker, Baghdad bureau chief for the Reuters news agency, about the temporary closure of Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison. Its 2,400 inmates will be transferred.
NPR

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

Central High School in Tuscaloosa, Ala., was once considered a model of desegregation. Today, the school's population is 99 percent black. One family's story underscores three generations of change.
NPR

Sunni Discontent Fuels Growing Violence In Iraq's Anbar Province

Fed up with what they say is years of discrimination by the Shiite-led government, ordinary Sunnis have joined Islamist fighters. There are echoes of past conflicts, with a few important distinctions.
NPR

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

Thirty-six years after Congress passed the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, employers still have very different interpretations of what they're required to do to accommodate expectant mothers.

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