WAMU 88.5 : Support

WAMU 88.5 Membership

When you give to WAMU 88.5, your gift directly supports the programs you rely on every day.

WAMU 88.5 is listener-supported public radio. 100 percent of listener contributions are dedicated to pay for the cost of making WAMU 88.5 programs possible. When you give to WAMU 88.5, your tax-deductible membership gift directly supports the award-winning programs upon which you've come to expect and rely, including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, The Diane Rehm Show, The Kojo Nnamdi Show, Car Talk, Hot Jazz Saturday Night, Stained Glass Bluegrass, The Big Broadcast, and many more!

Diane Rehm talks about the people who make public radio possible -- you!

Financial contributions from listeners are WAMU 88.5's largest and most reliable source of support. During fiscal year 2002-2003, membership contributions provided approximately 57% of the station's operating costs. Every dollar you invest provides a positive return immediately whenever you tune to WAMU 88.5, or connect to our audio stream at wamu.org.

Three ways to contribute

Online

Our secure server payment system is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Start here.

By telephone

Please call WAMU 88.5 Member Services weekdays between 9am and 5pm at (202)885-1252.

By mail

Please make your check payable to WAMU 88.5 and mail it to:

American University
WAMU-FM
P.O. Box 17539
Baltimore, MD 21297-1539

NPR

Smithsonian Sets Phasers To Restore On Original Starship Enterprise

The Starship Enterprise — from the original Star Trek series — has gotten a restoration fit for a real life spacecraft. It goes on display this week at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
NPR

In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

Perdue Farms, one of the largest poultry companies in the country, says it will change its slaughter methods and also some of its poultry houses. Animal welfare groups are cheering.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.