Membership FAQ | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Support

Membership FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions

Have a question about WAMU Membership? Chances are you'll find the answer here.

WAMU is dedicated to providing world-class service to our members. The answer to your question could very well be found on this page. If your question is not answered below, or if you would prefer to have your concern addressed individually, please send us an email to: membership@wamu.org or call us at (202) 885-1252.

FAQ

I'm a current member and do not receive the WAMU eNewsletter, Inside WAMU. How do I go about receiving it?

Unless specifically declined, current members who contribute $50 or greater may subscribe to receive the eNewsletter. Please email your request to membership@wamu.org.

I'm a member and need to report a change of address. Can I request the change by email?

Certainly. Simply send your email to membership@wamu.org with your old address, your new address, and your name and telephone number.

Are my contributions to WAMU tax deductible?

WAMU 88.5 is your public radio station licensed to American University, which is designated as a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization. As such, your contributions are eligible for tax deduction.

Per IRS requirements, contributions to WAMU are tax deductible to the extent that tangible personal benefits are not received in return. If you received thank-you gifts and you contributed a total of $89 or greater during the calendar year, WAMU may be required to notify you of the estimated amount of your gift that remains eligible for tax deduction.

Contributions for which no thank-you gift was requested or received are fully deductible for tax purposes. The WAMU eNewsletter, coffee mugs, keychains, and other items that feature the WAMU logo are token items, and do not affect your gift for the purpose of tax substantiation and disclosure.

Why haven't I received a tax receipt for my contribution?

Typically, such notification is included at the bottom of our acknowledgment letter sent to you within one week after receipt and processing of your contribution. For members who have pledged $120 or greater during the prior calendar year and are fulfilling an annual pledge through monthly installment payments, WAMU provides a single acknowledgment letter during the month of January. If you accepted thank-you gifts, our estimate of the amount of your contribution that is eligible for tax deduction purposes is indicated. If you do not receive your letter by mid-February, please let us know by calling the WAMU Member Service Department at (202) 885-1252.

When does my membership expire?

For first-time members, WAMU membership expires one year from the date your membership record is created. For renewing members, your membership expires one year from the date your record is updated.

Who won the Apple iPad from the May membership campaign?

Congratulations to Rhonda Royal of Upper Marlboro, Md., who won the drawing for an Apple iPad during the new and returning membership campaign in May. Rhonda was chosen at random from more than 3,700 entries. Thanks to all who participated!

winner Rhonda Royal
Photo caption: Apple iPad Giveaway Winner Rhonda Royal

WAMU 88.5

Capital Fringe Fest's 'Bethesda' Hits Close To Home

The annual Capital Fringe Festival, which aims to bring new energy and artists to the D.C. area performing arts community, is back. This year's program includes one play that hits close to home.
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Economists Say Inflation Is Tame; Consumers Aren't Buying It

On paper, inflation has been low this year. But consumers buying food or fuel may disagree. Prices for beef, eggs, fresh fruit and many other foods are much higher than overall inflation.
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Administration Officials Defend Funding Request To Stem Border Crisis

President Obama has asked for $3.7 billion to deal with the southern border crisis. There are predictions the number of unaccompanied children entering the U.S. could reach 90,000 by October.
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NSA Implementing Fix To Prevent Snowden-Like Security Breach

A year after Edward Snowden's digital heist, the NSA's chief technology officer says steps have been taken to stop future incidents. But he says there's no way for the NSA to be entirely secure.