Programming Changes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Schedule

Programming Changes

New Schedule on WAMU 88.5

Weekday Schedule

At WAMU 88.5, your gateway for award-winning journalism and insightful storytelling from the local to the global, we're expanding our coverage with three shows. And we’re making some changes to create a more robust listening experience in midday.

Beginning Aug. 4, we are adding two new programs—BBC Newshour and Here & Now—expanding Q with Jian Ghomeshi and adjusting our midday programming. We’re also moving Fresh Air to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Read more about why we're changing our schedule.

 

BBC Newshour
Weekdays at 9 a.m.

Broadcast on more than 1,000 stations worldwide, BBC Newshour cuts through the background noise of 24-hour news coverage and provides definitive reports on the big stories of the day. News bulletins, international interviews and in-depth reports of world news create a robust hour of international news and current affairs.

BBC Newshour will follow four hours of Morning Edition and will air before The Diane Rehm Show, which offers national and international perspectives on politics, current affairs and the arts.

 

Here & Now
Monday-Thursday at 3 p.m.

Here & Now, a collaboration between NPR and WBUR in Boston, reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. With a strong focus on international current events, co-hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson tackle the key issues of the day.

Here & Now will follow Fresh Air in its new 2 p.m. timeslot and will air before All Things Considered, our daily national and local news program.

 

Q with Jian Ghomeshi
Weeknights at 10 p.m.

Q is an energetic international arts, culture and entertainment magazine that takes you on a smart and surprising ride, interviewing personalities and tackling the cultural issues that matter. Hosted by Jian Ghomeshi, with his trademark wit and spontaneity, Q covers topics from pop culture and high arts, highlighting the most provocative and compelling cultural trends.

Weekend Schedule

We’re bringing our listeners some enhancements to weekend listening. Beginning Aug. 4, we are introducing Marketplace Weekend, retiring the Sunday rebroadcast of Car Talk and making some schedule changes.

Introducing Marketplace Weekend
Sundays at 7 a.m.

Marketplace’s newest program, Marketplace Weekend brings listeners something new. Each week, Lizzie O’Leary will bring context and conversation to personal finance and how we fit into the big news of the week. The show will also take a deeper dive into a recent Marketplace story, sharing a conversation with the reporter who broke the news.

Day 6, CBC Radio's Day 6, Canada’s news magazine of the week’s events, is moving to day six (Saturdays) at 4 p.m.

On Being with Krista Tippett moves to 6 a.m. Sundays

Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me moves to 10 a.m. Sundays

TED Radio Hour moves to 11 a.m. Sundays

Backstory moves to 2 p.m. Sundays

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