Langhorne Slim On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Langhorne Slim On World Cafe

Singer-songwriter Langhorne Slim (real name: Sean Scolnick) took his stage name from his hometown of Langhorne in Bucks County, Pa. After studying at the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, Slim moved to Brooklyn and built a national following by touring with The Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players. Eventually, he made his way to Portland, Ore., where he's lived since the 2009 release of Be Set Free. That record was the first since Slim joined up with his band The Law — Jeff Ratner on upright bass, David Moore on keys and banjo, Malachi DeLorenzo on drums — which helps lend depth to his raw, bluesy rasp.

Langhorne Slim's newest record, The Way We Move, blends hints of '50s rock ballads with rootsy arrangements and soulful singing. In this session of World Cafe, Slim talks to host David Dye about the influences in his music and the way he looks at his musical genre as "folk-gospel-punk." Check back to hear Langhorne Slim perform live versions of songs from his new album.

This episode originally aired on August 2, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

A Poet Parses The Legacy Of War In 'My Life As A Foreign Country'

When award-winning poet Brian Turner served in the Army, he was following a long family tradition. His new memoir traces that history — and imagines the perspectives of the people shooting back.
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Man Caught At White House Is An Army Veteran

Omar J. Gonzales, the 42-year-old man who the Secret Service says ran onto the White House grounds and entered a door Friday night, is an Army veteran who served in Iraq.
NPR

Drivers, Passengers Say Uber App Doesn't Always Yield Best Routes

People love Uber, but they often complain the Uber app's built-in navigation doesn't give its drivers the best directions. The company says the app helps drivers and passengers travel efficiently.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.