NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Langhorne Slim On World Cafe

Singer-songwriter Langhorne Slim (real name: Sean Scolnick) took his stage name from his hometown of Langhorne in Bucks County, Pa. After studying at the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, Slim moved to Brooklyn and built a national following by touring with The Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players. Eventually, he made his way to Portland, Ore., where he's lived since the 2009 release of Be Set Free. That record was the first since Slim joined up with his band The Law — Jeff Ratner on upright bass, David Moore on keys and banjo, Malachi DeLorenzo on drums — which helps lend depth to his raw, bluesy rasp.

Langhorne Slim's newest record, The Way We Move, blends hints of '50s rock ballads with rootsy arrangements and soulful singing. In this session of World Cafe, Slim talks to host David Dye about the influences in his music and the way he looks at his musical genre as "folk-gospel-punk." Check back to hear Langhorne Slim perform live versions of songs from his new album.

This episode originally aired on August 2, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit

WAMU 88.5

Anne Tyler: "A Spool Of Blue Thread" (Rebroadcast)

In her first live radio interview ever, Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Tyler joins Diane to talk about her 20th novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."


Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

An artisanal salt producer is processing brine from ancient ocean deposits below West Virgina's mountains. The company, J.Q. Dickinson Salt-Works, ships to top chefs who value the salt's minerality.

Downed Russian Warplane Highlights Regional Divide On Syria

Hugh Pope, director of communications and outreach at the International Crisis Group in Brussels, explains the growing divide between Turkey and Russia on their priorities inside Syria.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.