NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Langhorne Slim On World Cafe

Singer-songwriter Langhorne Slim (real name: Sean Scolnick) took his stage name from his hometown of Langhorne in Bucks County, Pa. After studying at the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, Slim moved to Brooklyn and built a national following by touring with The Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players. Eventually, he made his way to Portland, Ore., where he's lived since the 2009 release of Be Set Free. That record was the first since Slim joined up with his band The Law — Jeff Ratner on upright bass, David Moore on keys and banjo, Malachi DeLorenzo on drums — which helps lend depth to his raw, bluesy rasp.

Langhorne Slim's newest record, The Way We Move, blends hints of '50s rock ballads with rootsy arrangements and soulful singing. In this session of World Cafe, Slim talks to host David Dye about the influences in his music and the way he looks at his musical genre as "folk-gospel-punk." Check back to hear Langhorne Slim perform live versions of songs from his new album.

This episode originally aired on August 2, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit


ABC Celebrates 50th Anniversary Of 'A Charlie Brown Christmas'

ABC will air "It's Your 50th Christmas Charlie Brown" Monday night. On the classic Christmas cartoon's golden anniversary, NPR explores what makes this ageless special endure.

L.A.'s Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

Providence is widely considered the finest restaurant in Los Angeles. Its award-winning chef, Michael Cimarusti, is piloting Dock to Dish, a program that hooks chefs up directly with local fishermen.

Top Paper's Endorsement Doesn't Always Equal Success In New Hampshire

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie nabbed the backing of the New Hampshire Union Leader this weekend, citing his executive and national security experience. But that doesn't mean he's guaranteed a win.

Big Data Predicts Centuries Of Harm If Climate Warming Goes Unchecked

It took about 30 teams of scientists worldwide, using supercomputers to churn through mountains of data, to see patterns aligning of what will happen decades and centuries from now.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.