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Langhorne Slim On World Cafe

Singer-songwriter Langhorne Slim (real name: Sean Scolnick) took his stage name from his hometown of Langhorne in Bucks County, Pa. After studying at the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, Slim moved to Brooklyn and built a national following by touring with The Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players. Eventually, he made his way to Portland, Ore., where he's lived since the 2009 release of Be Set Free. That record was the first since Slim joined up with his band The Law — Jeff Ratner on upright bass, David Moore on keys and banjo, Malachi DeLorenzo on drums — which helps lend depth to his raw, bluesy rasp.

Langhorne Slim's newest record, The Way We Move, blends hints of '50s rock ballads with rootsy arrangements and soulful singing. In this session of World Cafe, Slim talks to host David Dye about the influences in his music and the way he looks at his musical genre as "folk-gospel-punk." Check back to hear Langhorne Slim perform live versions of songs from his new album.

This episode originally aired on August 2, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

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