NPR : World Cafe

Next: Japandroids
Every week, World Cafe recommend a new artist on the rise.

Before Japandroids reached the popularity they've earned today, guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse had to endure some ups and downs. In the beginning, the duo gave up the search for a lead vocalist and third member, deciding instead to split vocal duties. This turn of events ended up affecting the band's dual but equal decision-making process — even the band's name is a hodgepodge of ideas from each member.

Throughout the years, they financed and organized shows completely on their own. After recording their 2008 debut Post-Nothing, Prowse and King split, feeling that Japandroids wasn't going anywhere through their efforts alone. Yet the Canadian label Unfamiliar Records saw potential in the duo and put out Post-Nothing the following year.

Since then the band signed to Polyvinyl Records and began working on the sophomore release Celebration Rock. The Vancouver noise rock duo is on the grind, finishing up the U.S. leg of a world tour and then playing hugely energetic shows in Europe the rest of the summer. World Cafe's David Dye spins two new songs from Celebration Rock in this installment of World Cafe: Next.

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