Edward Sharpe And The Magnetic Zeros On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Edward Sharpe And The Magnetic Zeros On World Cafe

A band's sound is only as big as its members, and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros' music is huge. The 10 members are a whirl of roving horns, as well as whistles, claps, shouts, strummed string instruments and percussion involving drums, hands and anything else they can find. The group's communal folk sound blew up in 2009 with the heart-pounding, foot-stomping single "Home"; with its universal sentiment, the song includes a back-and-forth between frontman Alex Ebert and bandmate Jade Castrinos.

In this World Cafe session, Ebert describes how the pair came to terms with performing "Home" as their relationship evolved from an undying friendship to a romantic relationship and back again over the past few years. Attempting to dissolve the categories and definitions of relationships in a blend of light and love, Ebert and the gang perform songs from their second album, Here.

This segment originally aired on June 8, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

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