NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Lana Del Rey On World Cafe

Lana Del Rey got her start at 18, when she was still known as Lizzy Grant and moved from Lake Placid to New York City to write songs and perform in clubs. In 2008, under her given name, she produced and released the EP Kill Kill independently. In 2010, her first album — the doubly eponymous Lana Del Ray [sic] a.k.a. Lizzy Grant — came out and was quickly pulled from circulation, though it'll be reissued this summer.

Late last year, Del Rey's breakthrough song "Video Games" became a YouTube sensation, and her major-label debut, Born to Die, came out in January, as she was making high-profile appearances on Saturday Night Live, Late Show With David Letterman and the Ellen DeGeneres Show.

A summer tour is sure to attract strong opinions; Del Rey's persona and performances have been lightning rods for criticism since before most people knew who she was. But in the meantime, on this episode of World Cafe, she talks to host David Dye about her SNL appearance and plays songs from Born to Die live in the studio.

This segment originally aired on June 1, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

With A Little Help From Larry David, Bernie Sanders Does SNL

Bernie Sanders impersonator Larry David hosted the episode with a cameo from the senator himself. Sanders slipped in a main campaign message, while David jabbed at the candidate's cantankerous side.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.