The Lumineers On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

The Lumineers On World Cafe

April was a great month for The Lumineers. In addition to releasing its eponymous debut, the band played a ton of sold-out shows across the U.S. The Lumineers' open-hearted melodies, rousing acoustic folk sound and simple but raw lyrics have earned the group comparisons to Mumford & Sons, The Civil Wars and The Avett Brothers; still, The Lumineers' members have a way of embedding fiery emotion into their music that's all their own. Rollicking, incandescent and reflective, it's music built on a foundation of classical training and roots-rock touring.

The Lumineers' self-titled debut is already doing well thanks to "Ho Hey," a bluegrass-infused folk-pop single that almost requires the stomping of feet to the beat. The album also features a few songs from the band's EP, as well as great new material like the instant standout "Dead Sea." The Lumineers will perform at WXPN's annual XPoNential Music Festival in July — one of countless tour stops on an inevitable march to ubiquity.

This segment originally aired on July 16, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

CBS' Bob Schieffer Retires Sunday As Last Of The Old-School TV Anchors

Bob Schieffer, anchor of CBS' Face the Nation, retires Sunday after 46 years at the network. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans says Schieffer is the last among a vanished breed of traditional news anchors.
NPR

Trickster Journalist Explains Why He Duped The Media On Chocolate Study

John Bohannon, the man behind a stunt that bamboozled many news organizations into publishing junk science on dieting, talks to NPR's Robert Siegel about why he carried out the scheme.
NPR

CBS' Bob Schieffer Retires Sunday As Last Of The Old-School TV Anchors

Bob Schieffer, anchor of CBS' Face the Nation, retires Sunday after 46 years at the network. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans says Schieffer is the last among a vanished breed of traditional news anchors.
NPR

As Police Body Cameras Increase, What About All That Video?

Police cams have suddenly become a big business. But the real money is in selling departments a way to store each day's video. Firms are offering easy uploads to the cloud but costs are bound to grow.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.