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The Lumineers On World Cafe

April was a great month for The Lumineers. In addition to releasing its eponymous debut, the band played a ton of sold-out shows across the U.S. The Lumineers' open-hearted melodies, rousing acoustic folk sound and simple but raw lyrics have earned the group comparisons to Mumford & Sons, The Civil Wars and The Avett Brothers; still, The Lumineers' members have a way of embedding fiery emotion into their music that's all their own. Rollicking, incandescent and reflective, it's music built on a foundation of classical training and roots-rock touring.

The Lumineers' self-titled debut is already doing well thanks to "Ho Hey," a bluegrass-infused folk-pop single that almost requires the stomping of feet to the beat. The album also features a few songs from the band's EP, as well as great new material like the instant standout "Dead Sea." The Lumineers will perform at WXPN's annual XPoNential Music Festival in July — one of countless tour stops on an inevitable march to ubiquity.

This segment originally aired on July 16, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

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