John Mayer On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

John Mayer On World Cafe

Becoming a rock star has major implications — just ask John Mayer. The singer-songwriter's personal history and relationships are all public knowledge, thanks to the enormous media attention that the 34-year-old attracts. The attention in turn attracts trouble, but Mayer, who has just released his fifth solo studio album, tries to take it all in stride.

In today's episode of World Cafe, Mayer discusses the circumstances under which he recorded Born and Raised. In the midst of recording the album, he was diagnosed with granulomas near his vocal cords, which required surgical treatment. After he recovered, he finished the album, but now has to take time off from touring. Mayer says he plans to use his time off to write new material and reflect on his career.

Mayer also discusses the paranoia that can come with stardom. A self-described "control freak," he opens up about how time off and songwriting allow him to lose himself in the process and churn out songs that are personal, yet universal. Hear Mayer play a few songs from Born and Raised on today's episode of World Cafe.

This edition of World Cafe originally aired May 25, 2012.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

A Puzzle With Everything, Including The Kitchen Sink

Each word provided is an anagram of something you might see in a kitchen. For example, "skin" is an anagram of "sink."
NPR

'Into The Wild' Author Tries Science To Solve Toxic Seed Mystery

Jon Krakauer has long been haunted by how Christopher McCandless died in the Alaskan wilderness. In a scientific journal, he and a chemist show that the seeds McCandless consumed can contain a toxin.
NPR

5 Things You Should Know About Carly Fiorina

The former CEO of Hewlett-Packard once had a stint filing and typing for the company. She also dropped out of law school, survived breast cancer and once ran a campaign ad featuring demon sheep.
NPR

3-D Printers Bring Historic Instruments Back To The Future

You just can't stick a modern mouthpiece on an antique saxophone and get the right sound. The answer could be in the lab.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.