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Next: Said The Whale
Every week, World Cafe recommends a new artist on the rise.

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The Canadian band Said the Whale was founded by singer-songwriters Ben Worcester and Tyler Bancroft in 2007. Though the group has seen several lineup changes since then, that pair's commitment to churning out records and touring North America has paid off: Said the Whale's second album, Islands Disappear, produced a hit single with "Camilo (The Magician)." The group has shared the stage with Tokyo Police Club, Plants and Animals, City and Colour and The Weakerthans. Between touring and writing, the members of Said the Whale seem to always be in motion.

This year's Little Mountain plays front to back effortlessly, and sounds at times like early Shins and even Neutral Milk Hotel. From crooning to pop-rock toe-tapping, each track leads seamlessly into the next. Hear "Big Wave Goodbye" and "Loveless" from Little Mountain on this episode of World Cafe Next.

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