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Next: Allo Darlin'
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The four friends who make up Allo Darlin' write upbeat indie-pop and play instruments from lap steel to ukulele — and all of them sing, harmonizing with two Australian accents and two British ones. The band came together to make music in 2009, and within a year of getting serious, frontwoman Elizabeth Morris and bandmates Paul Rains, Bill Botting and Mikey Collins released a self-titled debut album. They've spent the last two years touring and writing music for a second record, which came out last month.

Allo Darlin's new album, Europe, is another sunny collection of songs about love, dreaming and friendship. The lyrics are sprinkled with selective details from the life of a young singer: cassette tapes, postcards, surf magazines and beaches with nice names. The album's personal quality offers a testament to Morris' songwriting, as well as to her musical collaboration with her three bandmates. Hear "Capricornia" and "Tallulah" on today's episode of World Cafe: Next.

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