Next: Allo Darlin' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

Next: Allo Darlin'
Every week, World Cafe recommends a new artist on the rise.

Play associated audio

The four friends who make up Allo Darlin' write upbeat indie-pop and play instruments from lap steel to ukulele — and all of them sing, harmonizing with two Australian accents and two British ones. The band came together to make music in 2009, and within a year of getting serious, frontwoman Elizabeth Morris and bandmates Paul Rains, Bill Botting and Mikey Collins released a self-titled debut album. They've spent the last two years touring and writing music for a second record, which came out last month.

Allo Darlin's new album, Europe, is another sunny collection of songs about love, dreaming and friendship. The lyrics are sprinkled with selective details from the life of a young singer: cassette tapes, postcards, surf magazines and beaches with nice names. The album's personal quality offers a testament to Morris' songwriting, as well as to her musical collaboration with her three bandmates. Hear "Capricornia" and "Tallulah" on today's episode of World Cafe: Next.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

Weekend Musher Finds Dogs Keep Her Hanging On

Julia Bayly of Fort Kent, Maine, works as a reporter at the Bangor Daily News. Her passion outside of work is dog sledding. It's the latest installment in our hobby series "Alter Egos."
NPR

A Peace Corps Stint In Madagascar Gave Him A Vision of Vanilla

The top source of vanilla beans sends its fragrant crop abroad for processing into extract. Now a former Peace Corps volunteer aims to boost Madagascar's economy by building a bean-to-bottle business.
NPR

Rep. Ryan Calls For 'Culture Of Inclusion' To Tackle Poverty

Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
NPR

New Amazon Series Pilots Fall Short Of A TV Revolution

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans ranks Amazon's new batch of five series pilots, asking why none of them seem break the rules of TV quite enough to draw attention.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.