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Daniel Rossen On World Cafe

By now, Daniel Rossen's name is synonymous with the kind of raggedy, whimsical, airy music he writes. A contributing songwriter and musician in Grizzly Bear, Rossen often saved his most personal compositions for his other band, Department of Eagles, which shares Grizzly Bear's roots in Rossen's undergraduate years at NYU. Both bands saw success, and Rossen continued to work in both projects. Over time, Department of Eagles and Grizzly Bear began to overlap and blur together as members crisscrossed between bands. Still, even in this creative environment, Rossen needed another outlet.

With his first solo EP, Rossen found another channel for his music. On Silent Hour/Golden Mile, Rossen sounds nostalgic and distant, while also creating music that feels emotional and immediate. Silent Hour/Golden Mile is a short, sweet burst, as well as a tantalizing hint of what to expect from the upcoming Grizzly Bear album. On today's episode of World Cafe, Rossen discusses the process behind his EP and plays "Golden Mile" and "Saint Nothing" live.

Live performances courtesy of WNYC's Soundcheck.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

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