NPR : World Cafe

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World Cafe Looks Back: Coldplay

Throughout the month of October, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of World Cafe and revisited some of the best and most memorable interviews of the past 20 years.

This week marks the release of Coldplay's fifth album, Mylo Xyloto, a raucous, electronically driven dance-rock record produced by experimental master Brian Eno. The band recently paid a visit to World Cafe to discuss the new album, which marks Coldplay's third trip to the studio in the last decade.

After listening to the newest session, we'll look back at Coldplay's past appearances on the show: a 2001 interview after the debut of Parachutes and a conversation from 2008, in honor of the Eno-produced Viva La Vida. Hearing these interviews, you can trace the band's maturation from an "inexperienced" group of college friends (who almost formed a boy band called "Pectoralz") to the Grammy-winning juggernaut it is today.

This segment originally aired on October 24, 2011.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Rita Dove: "Collected Poems: 1974 - 2004"

Rita Dove's poetry career has spanned more than forty years. During that time she won a Pulitzer Prize and became the first African-American poet laureate of the United States. Now she's released a new edition of collected works. Rita Dove on a life lived in verse.

NPR

Frozen Food Fears: 4 Things To Know About The Listeria Recall

The FDA issued a massive recall of frozen fruits and vegetables this week. Here's what you need to know about the nasty bug that's causing all the problems.
WAMU 88.5

Back From The Breach: Moving The Federal Workforce Forward

A year after a massive cyber breach compromised the databases of the Office of Personnel Management, Kojo talks with OPM Acting Director Beth Cobert about her agency and key issues facing the federal workforce.

WAMU 88.5

Why Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The U.S.

New research shows medical error is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 250,000 people a year. Why there are so many mistakes, and what can be done to improve patient safety.

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