NPR : World Cafe

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Los Campesinos! On World Cafe

After first coming together as a trio at Cardiff University in 2006, Los Campesinos! has blossomed into a septet with a reputation for lively indie-rock, in the spirit of everyone from Modest Mouse to Broken Social Scene to Belle and Sebastian. The generous joy in the Los Campesinos! sound first brought the group the label of "twee-pop," but in the past several years, the band has earned its reputation for dark humor, danceable beats and layered instrumentals.

Now on its fourth full-length album, Los Campesinos! continues to evolve. The 10 tracks on Hello Sadness, released in November, traffic in the signature Los Campesinos! sound — plenty of glockenspiel, love and soccer. But there's something more direct about the record: The sharp lyrics create deeply personal narratives, often about breakups. But the twisted humor and fresh beats from the Los Campesinos! repertoire make Hello Sadness even more exuberant than its predecessors.

The band performs songs from the new album in this World Cafe session with David Dye.

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