CANT On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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CANT On World Cafe

Chris Taylor may not be a household name, but you've probably encountered some of his work. Taylor was the bassist, producer and backing vocalist of Grizzly Bear on Yellow House and Veckatimest, in addition to running his own record label, Terrible Records. In addition to Grizzly Bear and his current solo project CANT, Taylor has also worked with Canon Blue, Dirty Projectors, The Morning Benders, TV on the Radio and Dev Hynes of Blood Orange and Lightspeed Champion, among others.

Though his solo material possesses some of the snowy softness he brought to Grizzly Bear, Taylor takes more risks as CANT, and his compositions are more heavily influenced by jazz, funk and shoegaze rock. CANT's debut album, Dreams Come True, also showcases Taylor's tremendous talents on the bass. His artful emphasis on the instrument — and ability to create syncopated bass lines beneath layers of guitar, keyboard, vocals and effects — lends his solo album a dimension of depth and wistful catchiness.

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