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Betty Wright On World Cafe

R&B icon Betty Wright signed her first local label deal when she was only 11, and by the time she was 17, she'd released her first hit single, 1971's "Clean Up Woman," which also crossed over to the pop charts. With a four-octave vocal range, an impressive grasp of the connection between gospel and R&B, and a sensual style, Wright continues to weave an impressive legacy. Her songs have been sampled by many hip-hop, rock and R&B musicians, including Mary J. Blige, Beyonce and Sublime, to name a few. A successful vocal coach, producer, writer and Grammy winner, Wright has helped advance the careers of Joss Stone and Jennifer Lopez, among others. She's also just released her 17th studio album, Betty Wright: The Movie.

Recorded with the ultimate backing band, The Roots, Betty Wright: The Movie is drenched with funk and soul. Wright says she sees it as an update to her classic sound, as she pulls in contributions from Snoop Dogg, Lil Wayne and Joss Stone. The resulting songs are anthemic in nature, co-written and co-produced by Wright herself, as well as The Roots' Ahmir "?uestlove" Thompson and Angelo Morris.

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