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The Little Willies On World Cafe

The informal nature of The Little Willies speaks to its members' chemistry and love of country-music classics; after all, their moniker is a tribute to country-music legend Willie Nelson. Composed of Norah Jones (piano, vocals), Richard Julian (vocals), Jim Campilongo (guitar), Lee Alexander (bass) and Dan Rieser (drums), the group got its start in 2003, playing at New York City's Live Room for sheer enjoyment. It soon became clear that The Little Willies' energy and talent could not stay limited to a one-time show. The band released its eponymous debut in 2006 — it's full of Townes Van Zandt, Hank Williams and Willie Nelson covers — and just returned, six years later, with For the Good Times.

Released in the beginning of January, For the Good Times is just as easygoing as its predecessor. Filled with new spins on country classics, the album features songs by Loretta Lynn, Johnny Cash and Dolly Parton. The result is relaxed, intimate listening that's always compelling. In today's show, Dye and The Little Willies discuss the band's origins and play favorite tunes from For the Good Times.

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