NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Ani DiFranco On World Cafe

Ani DiFranco called on a diverse lineup of guests, including Pete Seeger and Anais Mitchell, for her first new record in three years. Over the course of 21 studio albums in a 21-year career, DiFranco's folk-rock music has broached topics from politics to love, but has never strayed from being, as she would say, "righteous." In every sense of the word, DiFranco is the righteous rocker behind Righteous Babe records, the independent label on which she's been self-releasing albums since 1990.

DiFranco has just released a new, politically charged album, titled Which Side Are You On? The title track, a reworking of Florence Reece's union song from the 1930s, was popularized by Pete Seeger in the 1960s. DiFranco explains her motivations for the record as "testing deeper waters with the political songs... I guess I've been pushing my own boundaries of politics and art."

Here, Ani DiFranco performs live in the studio and talks to David Dye about the uncharacteristically long gap between her last album, Red Letter Year, and her new record.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit


'Not Without My Daughter' Subject Grows Up, Tells Her Own Story

"Not Without My Daughter" told the story of an American mother and daughter fleeing Iran. Now that young girl is telling her own story in her memoir, "My Name is Mahtob."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

President Obama says the U.S. must lead the charge to reduce burning of fossil fuels. But American lawmakers are divided on limiting carbon emissions and opponents say they'll challenge any new rules.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.