NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

World Cafe Looks Back: Rosanne Cash

Throughout the month of October, 2011, we celebrated the 20th anniversary of World Cafe, and revisited some of the best and most memorable interviews of the past 20 years.

World Cafe has been lucky enough to feature Rosanne Cash more than once; in fact, her interview from 2006 is one of our absolute favorites of the past 20 years.

Today's installment of World Cafe combines two of her most intimate interviews. The first is the 2006 conversation in which Cash presents songs from her dark and beautiful alt-country release, Black Cadillac. Produced by her husband John Leventhal, the record was written after the loss of many important influences in her life: father Johnny Cash, stepmother June Carter Cash and mother Vivian Liberto. The interview explores the profound impact of these events on her songwriting and performing.

Second, hear a 2009 interview with Cash about her 12th studio album, The List. This record was based on a list she'd received from her father that contained what he saw as the 100 greatest country songs. Cash picked 12 of them to sing on her album, and brought in guest performers like Bruce Springsteen and Elvis Costello to breathe new life into these classic tunes.

This segment originally ran on October 4, 2011.

Copyright 2012 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.
NPR

While Everyone Was Partying At Woodstock, I Was Stuck At Schrafft's

The chain restaurant that catered to women helped redefine how Americans eat, according to a new book. For NPR's Lynn Neary, it also defined how she did and didn't fit with the counterculture.
NPR

Newspaper Endorsements Matter Most When They're Unexpected

The New York Times endorsed Hillary Clinton on Saturday, but an endorsement that came the day before from a smaller paper may matter more to its readers, for the simple fact that it was unexpected.
NPR

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

How will the economy provide economic opportunities if employers need fewer workers in the future? A growing number of people in Silicon Valley are saying the only realistic answer is a basic income.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.