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Primus On World Cafe

Formed in 1984, Primus is best known for its irreverent funk-metal style, which came to dominate radio airwaves in the '90s. Since releasing its official debut in 1989, the band has experienced lineup changes over the years, but one important element has remained constant: the spiraling bass lines of lead singer and bassist Les Claypool. Throughout the '90s, Primus grew a cult following, then burst into the mainstream with releases like 1993's Pork Soda. The group also wrote the now-classic opening theme for South Park before going on hiatus in 2000. Primus re-formed in 2009, and has just released Green Naugahyde, its first full-length record in more than a decade.

Green Naugahyde relies heavily on a classic but re-energized Primus sound. Sometimes, complementary bass and drum lines pull the listener into Claypool's avant-garde social commentary; other moments are more lighthearted, as he sings about the joys of cars and fishing. Hear Primus perform songs from its latest record on this installment of World Cafe.

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