Paul Simon On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Paul Simon On World Cafe

Paul Simon's music can feel timeless even when it's filled with new ideas. In his interview with World Cafe host David Dye, Simon reflects on his friend Bert Jansch, who recently died, and discusses their friendship, which lasted more than 30 years. Noting the strange and uncomfortable feeling that he gets while watching himself and his peers age, Simon says it's a constant reminder of how quickly time can pass. In fact, it's been 25 years since he released Graceland, a touchstone for its incorporation of African instruments and world music into pop songwriting.

Simon explores many ideas surrounding life and death on his latest album, So Beautiful or So What. The album centers on themes of spirituality and mortality, often teasing out universal truths with a light and humorous touch. Simon is a master of writing songs that feel profoundly human without sacrificing their ability to work as great pop songs, so it comes as no surprise that his 16th studio album is a marvelous addition to his catalog.

Copyright 2011 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Audiences Get A Modern Look At A 19th Century Opera

Opera as seen through the lens of Google Glass? Wolf Trap is giving audiences the chance to mix technology with Bizet’s classic "Carmen" this month.
NPR

Can You Trust That Organic Label On Imported Food?

A new book claims the organic label can't be trusted, especially on food that's imported. Yet there is a global system for verifying the authenticity of organic food, and it mostly seems to work.
NPR

Democrats Make New Bid To Require Donor Transparency

The latest version of the DISCLOSE Act, which would force donor disclosure on outside organizations that engage in election politics, is facing now-familiar opposition from Republican lawmakers.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.