A Sense Of Place: Discover Dublin's Music Scene | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

A Sense Of Place: Discover Dublin's Music Scene

Throughout the week, World Cafe travels to Dublin, Ireland — the first stop in a quarterly series called A Sense of Place. We hope to give you an idea of the past and present of the city's local music scene and provide tips from musicians and music lovers for those hoping to visit this culturally rich town.

Today's segment of A Sense of Place explores the history of the contemporary music scene in Dublin, which has been slowly shaped into its current state since the 1970s. Discover what that entails, and hear about how the country's economic rise and fall — and its unique political and cultural history — has affected its music business, producing artists like U2, The Cranberries and Sinead O'Connor, among many others.

Acting as tour guide for this segment is Glen Hansard, the Academy Award-winning songwriter and singer for both The Frames and The Swell Season. Hot Press editor Niall Stokes, who helms the Irish equivalent of Rolling Stone, and musician Conor O'Brien of the band Villagers also provide local insight.

Copyright 2011 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Math Is Everywhere, But Especially On National Mall This Weekend

The first National Math Festival of its kind comes to the District Saturday, taking over the National Mall and Smithsonian museums.
NPR

How The Food Industry Relies On Scientists With Big Tobacco Ties

Critics of the system that ushers food products to market say it is rife with conflicts of interest. When scientists depend on food companies for work, they may be less likely to contest food safety.
NPR

On Links As In Life, D.C. Bipartisan Relations Are Deep In The Rough

Golf is a sport that's been enjoyed by both Democrats and Republicans through the decades, but bipartisan golf outings may be disappearing like a shanked tee shot into a water hazard.
NPR

What Does It Take To Feel Secure?

Computer security expert Bruce Schneier says there's a big difference between feeling secure and being secure. He explains why we worry about unlikely dangers while ignoring more probable risks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.