NPR : World Cafe

A Sense Of Place: Discover Dublin's Music Scene

Throughout the week, World Cafe travels to Dublin, Ireland — the first stop in a quarterly series called A Sense of Place. We hope to give you an idea of the past and present of the city's local music scene and provide tips from musicians and music lovers for those hoping to visit this culturally rich town.

Today's segment of A Sense of Place explores the history of the contemporary music scene in Dublin, which has been slowly shaped into its current state since the 1970s. Discover what that entails, and hear about how the country's economic rise and fall — and its unique political and cultural history — has affected its music business, producing artists like U2, The Cranberries and Sinead O'Connor, among many others.

Acting as tour guide for this segment is Glen Hansard, the Academy Award-winning songwriter and singer for both The Frames and The Swell Season. Hot Press editor Niall Stokes, who helms the Irish equivalent of Rolling Stone, and musician Conor O'Brien of the band Villagers also provide local insight.

Copyright 2011 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit


Making Art Off The Grid: A Month-Long Residency At A Remote National Park

Filmmakers Carter McCormick and Paula Sprenger recently wrapped up a month as artists-in-residence at Dry Tortugas National Park, 70 miles west of Key West. No phone, TV, Internet or other people.

After A Long Day Of Fighting Climate Change, This Grain Is Ready For A Beer

Kernza is a kind of grassy wheat that traps more carbon in the soil than crops like wheat and rice. Now, a West Coast brewery is using the grain in its new beer called Long Root Ale.

As Democrats Eye Senate Control, GOP Likely To Hold Slim House Majority

Democrats need a wave election to win the 30 seats they need to flip the House. But even with Hillary Clinton gaining in polls, Republicans are likely to hold onto their House majority, albeit a slimmer one.

Google Fiber Won't Accept Any New Cities For Its Superfast Internet Network

Google says it will honor its existing commitments to support or deploy gigabit-speed Internet. But it's scaling back the work on fiber optics to focus on "new technology and deployment methods."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.