NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Washed Out On World Cafe

Washed Out is the moniker of 28-year-old Ernest Greene, who recorded his first tracks on a laptop in his parents' Georgia home. Now, he's a wonder of the "chillwave" movement and the man behind some of the year's most alluring electronic sounds. Washed Out's debut album, Within and Without, builds a textured pop soundscape atop pulsing dance beats.

True to his digital roots, Greene posted his early recordings on MySpace, where they drew the attention of many prominent music blogs. He adapted quickly to the demands of playing live shows at clubs and festivals, both on his own and with the support of the New York band Small Black. Washed Out's sound is an ornate blend of murky vocals buried beneath layers of synths, strings and beats — a complex web tied together by Greene's melodies and mysterious voice.

With a full band in tow, Greene joins host David Dye in the studio for today's session of World Cafe, and discusses his early recordings, his reaction to anonymous opinions of his music on the Internet, and the rise of electronic dance music in the U.S.

Copyright 2011 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

Not My Job: Sharon Jones Gets Quizzed On Handshakes

We've invited the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings to play a game called "Let's shake on it."
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

Barbershop: Speechwriters Speak On The RNC And DNC

Republican speechwriter Mary Kate Cary, Democratic speechwriter Jeff Nussbaum and historian from the University of Virginia Barbara Perry dissect the last two weeks of speeches at the RNC and DNC.
NPR

From 'The Water's Edge To The Cutting Edge': Fish Skeletons, CT Scans And Engineering

Professor Adam Summers is a "fish guy." He uses fish to get engineering ideas. His latest project is to CT scan every type of fish — all 33,000 of them.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.