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Ximena Sarinana On World Cafe

Mexican singer-songwriter Ximena Sariñana first flexed her creative muscles in a role on the telenovela Luz Clarita, until she discovered her passion for music by composing scores for her father, a film director. Now, with two critically acclaimed albums under her belt, Sariñana is a household name in her home country, as well as a burgeoning international star. Her latest self-titled record marks the singer's first foray into English-language songwriting, a challenge she says has taught her to develop a style that's infused with diverse cultural elements from Mexico, America and Britain.

In transplanting her career from Mexico to the U.S., Sariñana's upbeat sound has become a blend of influences both American and international, ranging from Motown to electro-pop, and corralled by a sultry voice reminiscent of Fiona Apple and Cat Power. At once fiery and artful, the singer performs songs from Ximena Sariñana on today's installment of World Cafe.

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