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Jeff Bridges On World Cafe

It's not often that a well known actor of the caliber and fame of Jeff Bridges successfully (commercially and critically) crosses into another medium. But the Academy Award winner breaks the mold with his music — dark, bluesy country. It's good enough to make one forget about the celebrity at its source and just enjoy the music.

Jeff Bridges, the actor's second album, was produced by the legendary T-Bone Burnett, and includes singer Ryan Bingham and work from the late songwriter Stephen Bruton. The album has been called a continuation of the Crazy Heart soundtrack — authentic, easy-going, and a little Southern gothic. Bridges is the epitome of a cowboy poet here, adding just enough dark bass to make it not-so-typical country. Bridges' vocals draw comparisons to Bob Dylan, Neil Diamond and Gordon Lightfoot by turn, and the overall feel is one of quiet, constant ambling — place to place, beat to beat.

Hear Bridges play songs off his eponymous record on today's World Cafe.

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