Jeff Bridges On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : World Cafe

Filed Under:

Jeff Bridges On World Cafe

It's not often that a well known actor of the caliber and fame of Jeff Bridges successfully (commercially and critically) crosses into another medium. But the Academy Award winner breaks the mold with his music — dark, bluesy country. It's good enough to make one forget about the celebrity at its source and just enjoy the music.

Jeff Bridges, the actor's second album, was produced by the legendary T-Bone Burnett, and includes singer Ryan Bingham and work from the late songwriter Stephen Bruton. The album has been called a continuation of the Crazy Heart soundtrack — authentic, easy-going, and a little Southern gothic. Bridges is the epitome of a cowboy poet here, adding just enough dark bass to make it not-so-typical country. Bridges' vocals draw comparisons to Bob Dylan, Neil Diamond and Gordon Lightfoot by turn, and the overall feel is one of quiet, constant ambling — place to place, beat to beat.

Hear Bridges play songs off his eponymous record on today's World Cafe.

Copyright 2011 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

NPR

Prepare For 'The End Of College': Here's What Free Higher Ed Looks Like

In his new book, Kevin Carey envisions a future in which online education programs solve two of colleges' biggest problems: costs and admissions.
NPR

From War To Plow: Why USDA Wants Veterans To Take Up Farming

Sara Creech's nursing career fell apart after she returned from Iraq with PTSD. She found purpose - and a new path - on the farm. Now, the USDA is giving veterans like her more financial support.
NPR

House Votes To Fund DHS Until Sept. 30 — Without Immigration Curbs

The vote is a victory for President Obama as Republicans had wanted to strip funding for the president's executive actions on immigration from the bill.
NPR

Prepare For 'The End Of College': Here's What Free Higher Ed Looks Like

In his new book, Kevin Carey envisions a future in which online education programs solve two of colleges' biggest problems: costs and admissions.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.