k.d. lang On World Cafe | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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k.d. lang On World Cafe

Gifted with an extraordinary voice, Canadian singer-songwriter k.d. lang is a singular figure in the world of alt-country and adult contemporary pop.

lang's latest album, Sing It Loud, finds the four-time Grammy Award-winner still going strong after 28 years. She wrote Sing It Loud in collaboration with guitarist and songwriter Joe Pisapia, who also produced the album and leads Lang's new backing band, The Siss Boom Bang. It's the first time lang has worked with a band since the early '80s, and on today's World Cafe, lang says that collaboration has reinvigorated her songwriting.

In a wide-ranging interview with host David Dye, lang discusses the making of Sing It Loud and her return to country and "North Americana." Their conversation is accompanied by live versions of songs from the album recorded in a recent session for KCRW's Morning Becomes Eclectic.

This World Cafe interview originally aired August 5.

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