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David Bromberg On World Cafe

Grammy-nominated roots musician David Bromberg started his career as a session guitarist in the 1960s for the likes of Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson and Jerry Jeff Walker. He ventured out on his own to record a debut album in 1971, and has since created a unique style of blues that prominently features brass accompaniment, known as "hillbilly jazz."

This July, Bromberg released a new 12-track collection of his signature soulful blues. He chose to call the album Use Me, because each of his guest contributors — John Hiatt, Keb' Mo' and Dr. John, to name a few — not only wrote or picked songs to perform, but produced the sessions as well.

"It was taking my life in my own hands," Bromberg says. "In some cases I didn't know what they were going to do with me, but they all knew how to use me."

Hear these collaborations re-created by Bromberg and his band in a live performance on today's World Cafe.

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