Is There An Echo In Here? | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Is There An Echo In Here?

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On-air challenge: Every answer is a made up of a two-word phrase, in which the second word has three syllables, and the first word sounds like the last two of these syllables. For example, given the clue, "What the Italians smell in their capital city," you would say, "Roma aroma."

Last week's challenge: Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of an animal plus the sound it makes. What animal is it?

Answer: Lamb (La Bamba)

Winner: Wendy Lin of Berkeley, Calif.

Next week's challenge from American puzzle maker Sam Lloyd: You have a target with six rings, bearing the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39, and 40. How can you score exactly 100 points, by shooting at the target.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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