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Changing The World One Letter At A Time

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On-air challenge: For each geographical place provided, change one letter to make a new, common word that has a different number of syllables than the geographical name. Note: The answer word can have either fewer or more syllables than the geographical name.

Example: Lima = limp, limb, lime (for some of the names, multiple answers are possible)

Last week's challenge: Take the brand name of a popular grocery item, written normally in upper- and lowercase letters. Push two consecutive letters together, without otherwise changing the name in any way. The result will name a make of car. What is it?

Answer: Mazola, Mazda

Winner: Keith Gurland of Holmes, N.Y.

Next week's challenge: Name a capital of a country. Change the first letter to name a familiar musical instrument. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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