The Women Of HAIM On Starting Young | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

The Women Of HAIM On Starting Young

Play associated audio

Days Are Gone, the debut of the California sibling act HAIM, has been pegged for months as one of the year's most anticipated releases and was finally released this week. But before Este, Alana and Danielle Haim formed their current musical trio, they were in another group — with their parents. Under the name Rockinhaim, the sisters performed covers of classic rock songs alongside their parents. Danielle Haim says their musical indoctrination began early on.

"When I was around 3 years old, my dad put me on the drums. He kind of put all of us on the drums and taught us very [rudimentary] rhythms. We all took to it really well. Once we got a little older, my mom brought out her acoustic guitar and would teach us kind of simplified Joni Mitchell songs and Beatles songs," Danielle Haim says. "We grew up in L.A., and all you kind of do in L.A. is just spend your whole day in the car, driving from place to place. My parents would always put on the radio full blast and we'd listen to different stations and different types of music. They were just big music lovers, so I think that kind of seeped into our brains."

Click the audio link to hear NPR's Rachel Martin talk with the Haim sisters about the hype, their unique childhood band and, of course, the music.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Oct. 1

Music from West Africa and photography from South East Asia come to the D.C. area.

NPR

From Kale To Pale Ale, A Love Of Bitter May Be In Your Genes

Researchers have found a gene that affects how strongly you experience bitter flavors. And those who aren't as sensitive eat about 200 more servings of vegetables per year.
NPR

Obama Sidesteps Midterm Campaigning As Approval Ratings Slump

The president's job approval rating is somewhere in the low 40s. That means there are a lot of places where his presence would hurt more than it helps.
NPR

Facebook Apologizes For Name Policy That Affected LGBT Community

The social networking site will not change its requirement for people to use "real" names on their profiles, but it will adjust how alleged violations are reported and enforced.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.