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On-air challenge: This puzzle is supersonic. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name that has the consecutive letters S-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end in S-S, and the second word will start with T. For example, given, "A situation in which people speak on top of each other," you would say, "cross talk."

Last week's challenge from Gary Alstad of Tustin, Calif.: Think of a three-syllable word in four letters, add two letters and rearrange everything to become a two-syllable word in six letters. Then add two more letters and scramble them to get a one-syllable word in eight letters.

Answers: Idea, detain, strained, idea, diaper, traipsed, oleo, oodles, schooled (and others)

Winner: Bob Frizal of Mayfield Village, Ohio

Next week's challenge: In three words, name a product sold mainly to women that has the initials N-P-R. The answer is a common phrase.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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