Even Married, They Can't Be Together Legally | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Even Married, They Can't Be Together Legally

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Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

As immigration legislation moves through Congress, there are still major obstacles to any kind of compromise. It's a tense waiting game for those in the country illegally — even for those who supposedly have a leg up in the process because they have married a U.S. citizen.

Pediatric nurse Caly Muniz Castro works at a respiratory clinic for children, and her husband is in Brazil, hoping to receive legal status in the U.S. She shares her story with Rachel Martin, host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

"We've been married about a year and a couple of weeks. Unfortunately we just spent our one year anniversary very far apart from each other. He's in Brazil and I'm here in Minnesota."

Join Our Sunday Conversation

"Do you think it should be easier for illegal immigrants to become U.S. citizens?" Tell us on Weekend Edition's Facebook page or in the comment section below.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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