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Two Last Names For The Price Of One

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On-air challenge: Every answer today consists of two people, either real or fictional, whose last names are anagrams of each other.

Last week's challenge: It comes from listener Matt Jones of Portland, Ore. Jones creates a weekly syndicated puzzle called the "Jonesin' Crossword," which appears in more than 50 alternative newspapers around the country. The first 12 letters of the alphabet are A to L. Think of a familiar six-word proverb that contains 11 of these 12 letters (along with additional letters from the second half of the alphabet). What proverb is this?

Answer: Birds of a feather flock together

Winner: Elle Milgrom Stern of Los Gatos, Calif.

Next week's challenge: Name a famous performer whose last name has six letters. Move the first three letters to the end — without otherwise changing the order of the letters — and add one more letter at the end. The result, in seven letters, will name a place where this person famously performed. Who is it, and what's the place?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

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