Doo-Wop Dies Another Little Death As Store Closes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Doo-Wop Dies Another Little Death As Store Closes

Play associated audio

The style of music known as doo-wop had at least two heydays: Once in the 1950s and '60s, when the music was first recorded, and again during a revival in the '70s, thanks in part to nostalgic movies such as American Graffiti and Grease. But doo-wop is in a slump again, and one of its beacons in the northeast is about to close its doors after decades.

For some fans, nothing will ever replace the great vocal harmony groups.

"There's a certain purity to this music. A certain rawness that you don't get today," says one of those fans, Sandra Italiano. Her husband, Ronnie, was a fan, too. They even met at an oldies concert. Ronnie always hated the label "doo-wop"; his preferred term was "group harmony." Whatever you call it, he promoted the music with a vengeance, producing concerts and hosting a local radio show.

Sandra says her husband quit his job as a delivery man to start his own record store in 1972: Ronnie I's Clifton Music, on Main Avenue in Clifton, N.J.

"He took a big risk, leaving a good day job," Sandra says. "And it was the best thing he did, 'cause he was doing something he loved for so many years. He kept the music in his life, and he was able to share it with many."

Sandra kept the store going after Ronnie passed away four years ago, but at last, the day has come. After 40 years in business, Ronnie I's is closing this month. Sandra says the business has been in decline for years.

"It's just the regulars that have been coming, some of them since the store opened," she says. "The majority have passed on and moved away. Even some of the customers who used to come and buy stuff here are now downloading online. Why buy a CD with the song, when they can download it for cents on the Internet?"

Regular customers used to drive from all over the New York area to shop at Ronnie I's. Steve Siniawa of Saddlebrook, N.J., says Ronnie had the best selection. He knew more about the players and producers who made the records than anybody, Siniawa says.

"He should have been a detective. He was able to find a lot of the original singers to get information from them. And he grew up with the music," Siniawa says.

Warren Jacoby used to drive 50 miles from Ocean Township to Ronnie's almost every weekend.

"When I found out Sandie was closing the store, frankly, it's taken a piece of my heart away," Jacoby says. "I was not into The Beatles. I was not into any of those groups. I only wanted the stuff from the late '40s, the '50s. And I found it here. It's a sad time. You know, you think it's gonna go on forever. But I guess nothing does."

Jacoby hopes the music he loves will survive. Even if doo-wop does have another revival, Ronnie I's Clifton Music will already be history.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 30

You can keep things old school with a classic musical and an exhibit featuring watercolor paintings from the 1800s.

NPR

Farming The Bluefin Tuna, Tiger Of The Ocean, Is Not Without A Price

Scientists are trying to raise prized bluefin tuna completely in captivity. An experiment at a Baltimore college is the first successful attempt in North America.
NPR

Senate's Highway Trust Fund Bill Sets Up Conflict With The House

A short-term fix for the nearly empty Highway Trust Fund is a step closer to President Obama's desk. Congress has been talking about the long-term problems with the construction account, but the two chambers have not agreed on a long-term solution.
NPR

OkCupid Sometimes Messes A Bit With Love, In The Name Of Science

OkCupid, the online dating site, disclosed Monday that they sometimes manipulate their users' profiles for experiments.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.